Guided Delivery Systems successfully treats first patient with mitral regurgitation

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Guided Delivery Systems (GDS) announced on 16 September 2009 the first successful percutaneous implantation of the GDS Accucinch System for mitral valve repair. The procedure was performed by Joachim Schofer of Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum, Hamburg University Cardiovascular Centre in Hamburg, Germany. The GDS Accucinch System significantly reduced the patient’s mitral regurgitation without requiring open heart surgery.

Schofer commented, “While mitral valve repair is a common surgical procedure, it usually requires open heart surgery.  The GDS Accucinch System is introduced using catheters placed through the femoral artery. The interventional cardiologist can mimic a surgical mitral valve repair without opening the chest and without the need for heart lung bypass. Using this new technology the patient can be treated in a safe, less invasive way so he or she can quickly resume normal day-to-day activities. In fact, this particular patient was up and walking the day after the procedure, and able to return home to normal activities within a week.”


The GDS Accucinch System is an innovative percutaneous device, placed through an artery in the patient’s leg that cinches the subvalvular mitral annulus to reduce its size until the backward flow of blood through the mitral valve is corrected. This device mimics surgical mitral repair by directly modifying the geometry of the mitral apparatus in order to reduce mitral regurgitation.  The GDS Accucinch System can also properly size the mitral opening by use of measurements of regurgitation in the beating heart during the procedure which cannot be made when the patient is on a bypass machine.


Schofer will discuss the GDS Accucinch System and highlights from the case further on 25 September during the 2009 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Conference being held in San Francisco, US.


John Webb, St Paul’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada is co-principal Investigator for the clinical trial and is actively screening patients for the study. The number of clinical sites is expanding to include additional sites in both Germany and Canada, and additional studies are being planned in the US.